Guide for health workers to tackle diabetic blindness

January 29th, 2016 posted by IAPB in Blog, Diabetes, Diabetic Retinopathy, Global, Health Systems, Low Vision, Optometry, Universal Eye Health

One third of people with diabetes will develop eye damage in their life time. Every person with diabetes is at risk of going blind with diabetic retinopathy, however vision can be avoided. The International Diabetes Federation (IDF) and The Fred Hollows Foundation joined forces to develop a Guide to help health professionals care for the…Continue reading: Guide for health workers to tackle diabetic blindness »

New device to detect signs of blindness

January 25th, 2016 posted by IAPB in Blog, Diabetic Retinopathy, Innovation, ophthalmology, Optometry, Pacific Islands, Universal Eye Health

Solar powered, easy-to-use and pocket-sized, the Arclight is a tool to make out-reach or screening programs easier. Priced as low as £5 per unit, the Arclight performs as well as traditional devices.  After four years of informal trials in the Solomon Islands, Fiji, Ethiopia, Rwanda, Kenya, Malawi and Australia; plus a formal research assessment at the International Centre for Eye Health in London,…Continue reading: New device to detect signs of blindness »

Permanent eye program launches in Micronesia

January 20th, 2016 posted by IAPB in Blog, Federated States of Micronesia, Health Systems, Integration, Pacific Islands

The Federated States of Micronesia (also known as FSM or Micronesia) now has its own resident ophthalmologist, Dr Padwick Gallen, who has returned to the Pohnpei State Hospital after completing training at Pacific Eye Institute in Fiji. Micronesia is an island nation in the northern Pacific with a population of around 100,000 people. Pacific Eye Institute,…Continue reading: Permanent eye program launches in Micronesia »

Kiribati: New equipment to improve eye health

January 15th, 2016 posted by IAPB in Blog, Kiribati, NCDs, Negelcted Tropical Diseases (NTDs), ophthalmology, Pacific Islands, Refractive errors, Trachoma, Universal Eye Health, WHO

Essential equipment and instruments to improve eye health services in Kiribati were donated to Tungaru Central Hospital in
 Tarawa in early January, in an initiative supported by the Royal Australasian College of Surgeons (RACS) and Australian Aid. A slit-lamp, a‐scan, autorefractor, theatre
stools, surgical trolleys, a 
sterilizer and a vitrector are now available for use at…Continue reading: Kiribati: New equipment to improve eye health »